Logan County Animal Clinic https://www.loganvet.com/ Sun, 15 Mar 2020 18:49:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.1.1 Fact or Fiction? Common Spay and Neuter Myths for Pets https://www.loganvet.com/fact-or-fiction-common-spay-and-neuter-myths-for-pets/ https://www.loganvet.com/fact-or-fiction-common-spay-and-neuter-myths-for-pets/#respond Sun, 15 Mar 2020 18:49:42 +0000 https://www.loganvet.com/?p=979 With the advent of spring, many new kittens and puppies will be born, but not all these pets will have homes, severely overcrowding animal shelters, and putting a strain on limited funds for homeless pets. Roughly half the pets who enter shelters each year are euthanized because of lack of available homes, which can be [...]

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With the advent of spring, many new kittens and puppies will be born, but not all these pets will have homes, severely overcrowding animal shelters, and putting a strain on limited funds for homeless pets. Roughly half the pets who enter shelters each year are euthanized because of lack of available homes, which can be prevented by spaying and neutering pets to reduce overpopulation.

As a pet owner, you naturally want what is best for your furry friend, and you’re faced with many decisions throughout your pet’s life, to ensure continued health and happiness. One key decision is whether you should spay or neuter your pet, and at what age. To help clear up any confusion with the common myths about spaying and neutering pets, we’ve compiled a list of the most frequently encountered misconceptions. 

Myth: Spaying or neutering my pet will cause excessive weight gain.

Fact: The only way any animal—people included—gains weight is by consuming more calories than they burn. Most pets are spayed or neutered when they reach physical maturity and usually no longer need the extra calories and fat, but many pet owners continue to feed their cat or dog the same amount they fed when she was a growing puppy or kitten, instead of cutting back once maximum physical growth is achieved. Since an adult pet does not require as many calories, they’ll naturally gain weight. To calculate the appropriate number of calories your pet needs to maintain a healthy weight at every life stage, contact us

Myth: All female pets should have at least one litter.

Fact: Dogs and cats are not like people, and do not feel their biological clock ticking, or feel overwhelmed with a desire to experience childbirth. Spaying your pet before her first heat cycle will reduce the risk of several cancers, most notably mammary cancer. In cats, more than 85% of mammary tumors are malignant and aggressive, spreading throughout the body. In addition to reducing your pet’s risk for mammary cancer, spaying her before she has a litter eliminates problems during birthing, and health issues common in new mothers.

Myth: Neutering will make my pet feel less like a male.

Fact: Similar to attributing human emotions to female pets and childbirth, male pets do not have any concept of ego or sexual identity. By neutering your pet, you will experience a better companion, as removing the male hormones will reduce his desire to roam and find a mate. An intact male will do almost anything to find a mate, including escaping from home and risking his life in traffic, and fighting with other male animals. 

Myth: Spaying and neutering can cause health problems in my pet.

Fact: Spaying or neutering your pet when they are too young can impair growth and development, particularly for giant-breed dogs, whereas appropriate-age sterilization prevents many health issues. Removing reproductive organs reduces your pet’s risk of developing some cancers, reproductive-related infections, and problem behaviors.

Myth: After being spayed or neutered, my pet will act weird.

Fact: Spaying or neutering your pet will likely cause some behavioral changes, but for the better. For example, neutering your male will limit territorial marking and fighting with other males. Spaying your female pet will eliminate heat cycles, which are often displayed with yowling, whining, howling, and needy behavior. Female cats usually go into heat for four to five days every three weeks during breeding season, and will call and urine mark all over your home to attract a mate.

Myth: Anesthesia is not safe for pets.

Fact: Performing anesthesia while your pet is young and healthy poses few risks. As your pet ages, they more likely will develop reproductive issues, such as infection or cancer, which will make spaying or neutering essential for saving their life. Anesthesia while your pet’s health is compromised can be more challenging and more stressful for your four-legged friend. During your pet’s surgery, regardless of age, we take every precaution possible to ensure a smooth, successful surgery and recovery.

Myth: Spaying or neutering my pet is an unnecessary expense.

Fact: Spaying or neutering your pet costs far less than raising an unexpected litter, emergency surgery to remove an infected uterus, or chemotherapy and radiation treatment for a reproductive cancer. Like budgeting for your puppy or kitten’s vaccination appointments, you can also budget for your pet’s spay or neuter surgery by requesting a surgical estimate from our team, and creating a savings plan.

Do you have questions about the best age to spay or neuter your pet? Call us to schedule an appointment with one of Logan County Animal Clinic’s veterinarians, to discuss the optimal time to spay or neuter your furry friend.

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How to Inspire Toothbrushing – Look Inside Your Pet’s Mouth https://www.loganvet.com/how-to-inspire-toothbrushing-look-inside-your-pets-mouth/ https://www.loganvet.com/how-to-inspire-toothbrushing-look-inside-your-pets-mouth/#respond Wed, 12 Feb 2020 01:20:26 +0000 https://www.loganvet.com/?p=968 Your pet’s good dental health is vital for her general well-being, yet many owners ignore their pet’s needs for dental care. More than 70% of pets have developed dental problems by age 3, and the consequences of those problems, such as heart, liver, and kidney disease, can be life-threatening. However, dental disease can be prevented, [...]

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Your pet’s good dental health is vital for her general well-being, yet many owners ignore their pet’s needs for dental care. More than 70% of pets have developed dental problems by age 3, and the consequences of those problems, such as heart, liver, and kidney disease, can be life-threatening. However, dental disease can be prevented, ideally with an at-home daily toothbrushing regimen, as well as professional teeth cleanings at our clinic.

Read the following conversation between Jessica and her pet, Tiny Tim, for a lesson on the importance of maintaining your pet’s good dental health. 

Jessica: OK, Tiny Tim. Let’s give toothbrushing a try, since your veterinarian, Dr. Rexing, says it’s absolutely necessary. Hmmm … this may be difficult, so I think I will take a quick nap first.

Jessica lies down, and Tiny Tim snuggles with her. Jessica falls into a deep sleep and starts dreaming about brushing her pet’s teeth. Strangely, she hears Tiny Tim’s new toothbrush talking to one of his teeth.

Tooth: Excuse me. Who are you, and why are you here in Tiny Tim’s Mouth?

Toothbrush: My name is Toothbrush, but my friends call me Rush. Who are you?

Plaque, tartar, and disease 

Tooth: My name is Right Maxillary Canine, but my family calls me Maxine. Wake up Tiny Tim’s Tooth Team—we have a visitor. His name is Rush. As you can see, we were not expecting a visitor. We never cleaned Tiny Tim’s mouth after his last meal, so please excuse the mess and the smell. Why are you here?

Rush: Do you feel that thin, colorless stuff sticking to you? It’s called plaque, and it’s disgusting. It’s formed by the bacteria in Tiny Tim’s mouth, but it can easily be rubbed off by a toothbrush like me, or when Tiny Tim eats kibble, or plays with a chew toy.

Maxine: That’s what that sticky stuff is? It seems like no matter what I do, it keeps coming back. What happens if you don’t get all the plaque off?

Rush: The plaque turns into another substance called calculus, or tartar, which is as hard as the mathematics with the same name. It’s a big problem, because it won’t come off easily. It needs Tiny Tim’s veterinary team, and their special tools.

Rush: There’s more. Tartar can cause more problems, because the bacteria can burrow down under the gumline, where 60% of each tooth is hidden, and cause serious problems, including an infection called gingivitis. 

Maxine: Is gingivitis the redness that surrounds me and my fellow teeth at the gumline?  

Rush: Yes. Bacteria also will destroy the connection between the teeth and the gums, and can cause teeth to become loose, and possibly fall out. The bacteria can also get underneath or inside the teeth and cause significant pain.

Maxine: Several of us have been really painful, with no idea why. Last week, the gum around us became red and warm, and Tiny Tim’s breath smelled terrible. Then, the pain hit. We lost an incisor, too—it was heartbreaking. 

At-home prevention of plaque and other problems

Rush: I am so sorry to hear that. Also, it’s sad to say, but Jessica would not have been aware of the pain Tiny Tim was suffering because of your fellow teeth, because dogs seldom show pain. They will walk around, and eat, with painful, loose teeth until any dental disease has really advanced. Pet parents like Jessica won’t know something is wrong, and they can’t fix a problem they don’t know about.

Maxine: That’s terrible! What can Jessica do to protect us from such a fate?

Rush: That’s why I am here. When Jessica uses me to brush Tiny Tim’s teeth, I not only remove most of the plaque on his teeth, but I also stimulate blood flow in the gums, and the blood will take immune cells into the gums and fight off bacterial infection. 

Maxine: My hero! How often will we get to see you, Rush? 

Rush: At least three times per week, although daily is better to take care of you all. I will likely have on some pet-specific toothpaste, and Jessica may also use some oral gels or additives in Tiny Tim’s food or water to take care of you at a higher level.

Maxine: This tooth family wants to be really healthy. What else can Jessica do to help us, and Tiny Tim, thrive? 

Rush: Tiny Tim can also show Jessica the Veterinary Oral Health Council website, where pet owners can look for products like dental diet food and treats proven to fight plaque and tartar.

Going the extra (professional) mile for dental disease

Maxine: Wowsers, and what about the tooth family members that are painful now? Can Jessica help them, and Tiny Tim, if she doesn’t realize there’s a problem? 

Rush: You bet! The best thing Jessica can do is schedule Tiny Tim for a professional dental examination and cleaning immediately, and then every year. He needs his veterinarian to thoroughly assess his mouth, take dental X-rays to find problem teeth they can’t see without X-rays, and then deal with any loose, painful teeth.

Maxine: I think most of this tooth family would love a yearly deep cleaning, but isn’t all that scary for Tiny Tim?

Rush: Tiny Tim doesn’t need to be scared, and Jessica doesn’t need to worry, because professional cleanings are always done under anesthesia to ensure the pet stays still, and doesn’t suffer any pain or anxiety. And now, if it’s alright with you, I need to get to work brushing you and your family. 

Jessica wakes up. 

Jessica: I’m not sure how my subconscious knew all that helpful information, but now that I understand why brushing Tiny Tim’s teeth is so important, I will do it religiously. Come here, Tiny Tim. 

Does your pet need her first, or annual, professional dental cleaning? Call our hospital for an appointment, and help ensure your pet’s optimal dental health and general wellbeing.

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New Years Resolutions for Your Pet’s Health https://www.loganvet.com/keeping-your-pet-healthy-in-2020-2/ https://www.loganvet.com/keeping-your-pet-healthy-in-2020-2/#respond Sat, 11 Jan 2020 22:46:52 +0000 https://www.loganvet.com/?p=954 At New Year’s Eve parties, or while cuddled up on the couch with your furry family members watching the ball drop, you may have been thinking about what the next year would hold. A new year often means a fresh start, and that may include some well-meaning—but perhaps difficult-to-keep—resolutions. The good news for resolution-making pet [...]

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At New Year’s Eve parties, or while cuddled up on the couch with your furry family members watching the ball drop, you may have been thinking about what the next year would hold. A new year often means a fresh start, and that may include some well-meaning—but perhaps difficult-to-keep—resolutions. The good news for resolution-making pet lovers is that you can partner with your dog or cat to help reach your goals, and keep your pet healthy at the same time. Here are two common resolutions, and our tips for including your pet in 2020.

Human resolution #1: Managing finances better

Since your cat probably doesn’t have an American Expurress to support her hairband-eating fetish, and your dog can’t put the cost of the after-effects of his garbage binge on his Visla card, you are left footing the bills. The good news—you can stick to your budget, and still take care of your pet’s health. 

Preventive care is good for your pet, and your budget

The importance of preventive care cannot be overemphasized for your pet, and for helping to manage your finances. Ensuring your pet receives all the recommended vaccinations, routine dental cleanings, and flea, tick, intestinal parasite, and heartworm preventives is critical to help prevent diseases that may severely compromise your pet’s health, and which may be more expensive to treat than to prevent. We offer wellness plans that can be tailored to your individual pet, as well as the convenience of payment in monthly installments, rather than a lump sum when her regular exam is due. 

Planning ahead helps you and your pet

Not all diseases or accidents can be avoided with routine preventive care, so you should plan for unexpected expenses. Some people may prefer to take out pet insurance, while others may decide to put aside money each month to keep in reserve specifically for unplanned veterinary expenses. Also, Care Credit, which we accept at our clinic, can provide interim financing. These options can help you take care of your pet’s health, without as much strain on your finances, which can alleviate your own concerns.

Human resolution #2: Being more active

Regular exercise can benefit you and your pet emotionally and physically, especially if you reap those benefits together. Physical activity gives your pet an outlet for excess energy, builds muscle mass and fitness, may prevent behavioral issues, and helps maintain or achieve a healthy weight. Before starting an exercise program, you should bring your pet to our clinic for an exam to ensure she is in good enough health—this is particularly important If your pet is older, or has chronic health issues. Then, to maximize benefits and minimize problems, start with gentle exercise and gradually work up to a more intense workout. 

Exercising with your dog

Many dogs enjoy walking, hiking, swimming, or running with their owners, no matter the time or the weather, and your dog’s excited expectations likely will motivate you to get off the couch when you feel your resolve slipping. If your dog likes to play fetch, you can throw her the ball, and then do lunges, crunches, or other activities while she brings the ball back. In bad weather, you may be able to adjust to an indoor game of fetch while you use your treadmill, or you can train your dog to walk or run on the treadmill. 

Exercising with your cat

Most cats don’t enjoy outdoor activities like dogs, but your cat can still benefit from exercise, and also help keep you motivated. Give her a laser pointer to chase, a feathered wand to stalk, or a cat tree to entice her to jump, while you do your own exercise program. Some cats may also enjoy hunting for food scattered around the house, or in a feeding toy, which also can keep them entertained while you exercise.

Would you like to learn more about our wellness plans? Is your pet due for her regular checkup and preventive care? Are you getting ready to start an exercise program that includes your pet? Our veterinary team wants to see you achieve your resolutions so you and your pet have a healthy 2020. Contact us today.

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Keeping Your Pet Healthy in 2020 https://www.loganvet.com/keeping-your-pet-healthy-in-2020/ https://www.loganvet.com/keeping-your-pet-healthy-in-2020/#respond Tue, 17 Dec 2019 23:42:26 +0000 https://www.loganvet.com/?p=932 Many New Year’s resolutions focus on health and fitness, so why not include your pet in your 2020 goals? Regular veterinary care, including annual wellness exams, blood work, and dental cleanings, will keep your pet healthy, and help us detect health issues before they progress to more serious problems. Commit to making your pet’s health [...]

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Many New Year’s resolutions focus on health and fitness, so why not include your pet in your 2020 goals? Regular veterinary care, including annual wellness exams, blood work, and dental cleanings, will keep your pet healthy, and help us detect health issues before they progress to more serious problems. Commit to making your pet’s health a priority next year, and providing the critical wellness care she deserves.

Annual wellness examination for your pet

You pet should be examined by our veterinary team at least annually until she is 8 years old, at which point exams should increase to every six months. A wellness exam will include the following important checks:

  • Weight check — We will weigh your pet and compare her current weight to previous visits. If your pet has unintentionally lost weight, we will look closely at possible reasons for the unexplained loss, such as mouth pain or systemic disease. If your pet has become overweight, we will discuss weight-loss strategies to prevent weight-related disease development.

  • Physical exam — We will perform a thorough physical exam to evaluate each of your pet’s body systems. Unfortunately, many diseases cause subtle clinical signs that can be detected only by your veterinarian’s trained eyes, ears, and hands. Regular examination is critical to detect problems before they progress to an untreatable stage.

  • Vaccination — Disease prevention is one of the most important components of wellness care, and routine vaccination is critical to keep your pet healthy. In addition to core vaccines, such as rabies, parvo, and distemper, we will determine whether your pet should receive other vaccines, based on her exposure risk.

  • Parasite prevention — Parasites, such as fleas and ticks, are more than an annoying nuisance—they can carry dangerous diseases that they can transmit to your pet via a bite. Heartworms, which can be contracted from a mosquito bite, are another threat that can cause severe disease and death. Intestinal parasites are not typically as dangerous, but they can cause severe gastrointestinal upset, particularly in young animals. Fortunately, we can administer preventive medications to avoid these problems in your pet.

Annual blood work for your pet

Although the physical exam we perform during your pet’s annual wellness visit can help us detect some disease signs, many health conditions cause no obvious clinical signs, and can be detected only with in-depth testing. Annual blood work allows us to thoroughly screen for disease, so diagnosis can occur before illness becomes advanced. Routine blood work tests may include:

  • Complete blood count (CBC) — A CBC measures the amount of red and white blood cells and platelets in your pet’s blood, and compares them to normal established values. Abnormalities in blood-cell numbers can indicate problems such as infection, anemia, and blood-clotting disorders.

  • Blood chemistry — A blood chemistry test measures the levels of various chemicals produced by your pet’s organs, and provides valuable information about their function. Alterations in blood chemistry values can help us diagnose disease conditions such as kidney failure, liver failure, and diabetes.

  • Heartworm test — Dogs should be tested annually to ensure they are free from deadly heartworms. After we confirm that your pet is negative, preventive medication will keep her heartworm-free.

Your pet’s blood work results will be analyzed, and if abnormalities indicate disease presence, we may recommend further testing to reach a diagnosis. 

Routine dental cleaning for your pet

Dental disease is the most common health condition to affect pets, and without routine dental care, development is inevitable. Oral bacteria produce a sticky film called plaque that coats the tooth surface and mineralizes to tartar if not regularly removed by brushing. Only a professional dental cleaning can remove tartar, which, if allowed to accumulate, can spread below the gum line to also affect the tooth root. Dental disease that progresses can lead to tooth-root infection, loosening, and loss. Dental disease is painful, and affected pets often are in constant pain that owners may not notice. 

We recommend annual dental cleaning to keep your pet’s teeth healthy and disease-free. We perform a dental cleaning under anesthesia to allow a thorough examination of your pet’s teeth and oral cavity, and a complete cleaning of all tooth surfaces above and below the gum line. If advanced dental disease is present, affected teeth can be extracted during the procedure to alleviate pain and discomfort.

Make 2020 the year you commit to your pet’s lifelong health. Contact us with questions about your pet’s routine health care, or to schedule her annual wellness exam.

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Holiday Hazards Ahead: Every Pet Owner Should Watch for These Dangers https://www.loganvet.com/holiday-hazards-ahead-every-pet-owner-should-watch-for-these-dangers/ https://www.loganvet.com/holiday-hazards-ahead-every-pet-owner-should-watch-for-these-dangers/#respond Thu, 21 Nov 2019 23:18:57 +0000 https://www.loganvet.com/?p=863 The holidays are about creating memories with family and friends, two- and four-legged. But, they also present opportunities for mischief for your pet. Avoid unpleasant memories this holiday season by avoiding festive hazards that could harm your furry friend. Delicious dangers Your pet’s favorite part of the holiday season is undoubtedly the delicious aromas wafting [...]

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The holidays are about creating memories with family and friends, two- and four-legged. But, they also present opportunities for mischief for your pet. Avoid unpleasant memories this holiday season by avoiding festive hazards that could harm your furry friend.

Delicious dangers

Your pet’s favorite part of the holiday season is undoubtedly the delicious aromas wafting from the kitchen. As she sneaks underfoot in hopes of a dropped morsel, be careful about what may fall into her waiting jaws. The abundance of tasty entrees, sides, and desserts during Thanksgiving and Christmas ensures there’s no shortage of toxic foods. Avoid sharing the following holiday treats with your pet:

  • Ham and turkey — Ham is high in fat and sodium, which is the perfect recipe for pancreatitis for cats and dogs, causing vomiting, diarrhea, inappetence, lethargy, and abdominal pain. Dark turkey meat and the skin are also chock-full of pancreatitis-causing fat and sodium, as well as the bones that lurk in these holiday favorites. The large ham bone can fracture teeth or become lodged in the gastrointestinal tract, while the more brittle turkey bones can splinter into shards that can perforate your pet’s intestines.
  • Mashed potatoes — Plain mashed potatoes are rather bland, so we often load them up with ingredients that make them more mouth-watering. Garlic, onion powder, butter, and milk can cause serious issues in your pet, including anemia and signs of lactose intolerance.
  • Stuffing — Similar to mashed potatoes, plain stuffing is boring. As we add garlic, onions, seasonings, and spices, the potential for pet toxicity increases.
  • Pies and puddings — We doubt you want to share these delicious desserts, but still, avoid slipping your pet a bite. While plain canned pumpkin has health benefits for pets, pumpkin pie is loaded with sugar, spices, and dairy products, which can cause pets to suffer from holiday-ruining diarrhea. Pecan pies can pose a choking hazard if a small pet sneaks whole pecans from the pie.
  • Salads with grapes or raisins — We often think of salads as healthy, but fruit salads, Waldorf salads, and ambrosia salads can create serious health concerns for your pet, because they usually include grapes or raisins, which can lead to life-threatening kidney failure in dogs.

We’re sure you’re well aware of the dangers that chocolate poses to your pup, but we want to remind pet owners that a small amount of baking chocolate can have serious consequences, such as vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, and cardiac dysfunction. Avoid stockings stuffed full of milk chocolate goodies, as well, as the wrappers can lead to an intestinal obstruction. 

When in doubt about a food’s safety, skip it. Whip up a treat recipe for your dog or cat to help her savor the holidays, too.

Decoration disasters

The holidays are a time to show off your decorative flair, but many festive decorations can create a hazard for your pet. If you’re going all out for the holidays, keep a close eye out for these problems:

  • Strings of lights — Puppies, kittens, and also older pets can chew on inappropriate objects, such as brightly colored light strands. Electric cords may look like a fun rope toy, but they can shock or burn your pet’s mouth, and cause seizures, breathing difficulties, and cardiac arrest.
  • Glass ornaments — If your pet, especially your frisky feline, enjoys batting around balls, consider leaving the bottom half of your Christmas tree bare. Glass ornaments placed in reach of paws and tails can be knocked down and shatter into fragments that can pierce your pet’s paws.
  • Pine trees — Prickly pine needles can seriously upset your pet’s gastrointestinal tract, while fertilized or stagnant water can lead to vomiting and diarrhea.
  • Tinsel and garland — Your pet may look adorable and festive draped in tinsel and garland, but these sparkly strings pose a choking hazard, whether they become wrapped around your pet’s neck or ingested. Cats are particularly prone to swallowing ribbons and requiring emergency foreign-body removal.
  • Plants — Contrary to popular belief, poinsettias are not toxic to pets, but they can be irritating if chewed. Toxic holiday plants include mistletoe and holly, which can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, and heart arrhythmias if ingested.
  • Fireplaces — Pets and people alike delight in the cozy glow of a toasty fire, complete with stockings dangling from the mantel. Curious pets may want to play with tassels hanging from stockings, or investigate burning coals and ash, and get burned, or fall into the fire. Always place the fire screen in front of your fireplace to prevent accidents.

Party perils

Many pets are not party animals, and may experience stress and anxiety when confronted with large groups. Festive gatherings can also be fraught with other pet perils, so monitor your pet closely to avoid problems.

  • Costumes — While your pet may look adorable dressed up as a turkey, elf, or reindeer, she may not appreciate a holiday outfit. If you dress up your pet, avoid buttons, ties, and sashes that can create a choking hazard, and ensure the costume is loose-fitting, and that your pet can see.
  • Strangers — Many pets are wary of strangers, especially those who encroach on their homes. If your pet is not a social butterfly, set up her own party room away from the crowd.
  • Unattended food and drink — In the party commotion, plates of food and glasses of alcohol may be left in easy reach of a hungry or thirsty pet. Ask your guests to refrain from slipping her treats, and periodically check your home for unattended food and drinks.

If your party planning goes awry and your pet wrecks your festive plans by ending up on the naughty list, give us a call. We’re here to help ease the holiday stresses of pancreatitis, foreign body ingestion, and decoration destruction.

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Wellness Plans: The Path to a Healthy Pet https://www.loganvet.com/wellness-plans-the-path-to-a-healthy-pet/ https://www.loganvet.com/wellness-plans-the-path-to-a-healthy-pet/#respond Thu, 07 Nov 2019 23:17:29 +0000 https://www.loganvet.com/?p=849 Perhaps you’re a stressed-out, overwhelmed parent of five children—not to mention two dogs, three cats, one hamster, and two parakeets who also demand your attention. Or, you may be the sole caretaker of a shy feline who rarely ventures out. Regardless, having a family and pets always guarantees medical bills. Budget billing is available for [...]

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Perhaps you’re a stressed-out, overwhelmed parent of five children—not to mention two dogs, three cats, one hamster, and two parakeets who also demand your attention. Or, you may be the sole caretaker of a shy feline who rarely ventures out. Regardless, having a family and pets always guarantees medical bills. Budget billing is available for many services, such as utilities, insurance, and Amazon Prime. Why not also enroll in a plan that helps you budget for your pet’s care? Our wellness plans make it easy to plan ahead for your furry friend’s routine health needs. 

Benefits of our pet-wellness plans

We get it—pet care can be costly, especially when you add up the annual expenses. To help ease the financial burden of providing optimal preventive care for your beloved companion, we’ve created wellness plans that cover comprehensive routine care. Our wellness plans are designed for pet owners who want to take care of all their pet’s needs, but find that paying for everything all at once is difficult. Enrolling your pet in a wellness plan has numerous benefits, including:

  • An amount that can easily fit your monthly budget
  • Monthly payments that provide the best preventive care for your pet
  • A potential refund or rollover credit at the end of the year
  • Plans that are personalized for your pet’s needs
  • Automatic payment with an ACH debit

The simplicity of our wellness plans makes budgeting for your pet’s preventive-care needs a breeze. 

How pet-wellness plans work

Wellness plans differ from pet health insurance plans in that they cover only routine preventive care, and we suggest that you also consider pet insurance for emergencies, accidents, and illnesses to round out your protection plan. However, pet insurance may not cover your pet’s pre-existing conditions, whereas our wellness plans are available for each and every pet.

To enroll your pet in our wellness plan, we first perform a free assessment to determine the services your pet will need during the following year, based on age, breed, health status, history, and risk assessment. We then customize a plan that will fit your pet’s specific needs, but all our plans include:

  • Two wellness visits
  • A year’s supply of heartworm, flea, and tick prevention—Bravecto and ProHeart for dogs, Revolution Plus for cats  
  • Comprehensive blood-work panels
  • Two intestinal parasite exams, one of which will be sent to an outside laboratory for antigen testing
  • Core vaccinations for a dog or cat
  • Heartworm, Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, and ehrlichiosis testing for dogs
  • Dental X-rays
  • Dental cleaning

We may recommend removing some of these procedures, or adding other diagnostic tests or preventive-care options. Young pets usually are enrolled after their initial vaccination series is complete, while older pets join after their first dental cleaning. All costs for services that will be performed over the year are added and divided by 12 to calculate your monthly payment, which will be deducted from your bank account on the same day each month. If you need to cancel your wellness plan, we will refund the balance, minus the cost of any services that have already been performed.

Why wellness plans are important for your pet’s health

Preventive physical exams and wellness care can lead to a long, healthy life for pets, as they do for people. With the twice-yearly wellness visits included in our plans, we can closely monitor your pet for any changes in health status. We’ll keep an eye on weight, dental disease, behavioral changes, and differences in skin, hair coat, eyes, and ears. We’ll also monitor your pet’s cardiac and respiratory function by listening for abnormal sounds or rhythms, check for joint concerns with an orthopedic exam, and ensure all organ function remains strong through routine blood work.

With regular wellness visits, we can pick up on any changes in your four-legged friend that may indicate early disease stages. The sooner we find a disease, the better we can treat it, which can mean less expense for you, and a better prognosis for your pet. Wellness plans are better started at a young age to allow us to gather baseline readings on your pet’s normal values, and become more important for older pets, as we keep an eye on their health as they age. 

Eager to enroll your pet in our wellness plan? Schedule a free assessment so we can begin planning for a lifetime of health for your furry friend.

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A Closer Look: Logan County Animal Clinic’s Veterinary Technician Team https://www.loganvet.com/a-closer-look-logan-county-animal-clinics-veterinary-technician-team/ https://www.loganvet.com/a-closer-look-logan-county-animal-clinics-veterinary-technician-team/#respond Thu, 31 Oct 2019 18:50:24 +0000 https://www.loganvet.com/?p=831 At Logan County Animal Clinic, we love our veterinary technicians. They work hard every day, and their dedication and commitment to providing exceptional care for pets shines through in all they do. Read on to get to know our stellar behind-the-scenes crew.  Kimberly Starks Our most senior veterinary technician joined Logan County Animal Clinic in [...]

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At Logan County Animal Clinic, we love our veterinary technicians. They work hard every day, and their dedication and commitment to providing exceptional care for pets shines through in all they do. Read on to get to know our stellar behind-the-scenes crew. 

Kimberly Starks

Our most senior veterinary technician joined Logan County Animal Clinic in 2013. Originally from Auburn, Kentucky, Kimberly cannot pinpoint a time when she knew she wanted to become a veterinary technician, because “I always knew this was what I wanted to do.” Her passion for the field stems from being able to help “those who have no voice.” Despite her irrational fear of slobber, Kimberly shares her home with a myriad of furred and feathered friends, including Bryson, her insanely sweet 10-year-old pit bull terrier, and Waylon, her tiny, 10-year-old treasure. But, the fun doesn’t stop there. Kimberly also has Stone the hamster, Koda the cat, and three chickens. Of course, we can’t forget Kenzy, her darling 5-year-old daughter. When she’s not intimately caring for your pets, Kimberly can be found hanging with family and friends or practicing her photography skills. 

Auburn Todd

Hailing from Russellville, Kentucky, Auburn has been tending to pets at Logan County Animal Clinic for two years as a full-time veterinary technician. Her favorite part of the job is the opportunity to constantly learn, and keep her brain and body sharp. When asked whether she prefers dogs or cats, the answer is obvious, since she shares her home with three fluffy golden retrievers—Rhett, Raegan, and Rexha. You’ll hardly catch Auburn reading or running a 5K, and she much prefers camping versus glamping on weekends—as long as the camping doesn’t involve snakes.

Caitlin Mungo

If you hear someone singing in the treatment room, it likely is our technician, Caitlin, who started with Logan County Animal Clinic in February 2019. Since she was a child, Caitlin has wanted to work with animals, and she shares Kimberly’s passion for speaking for “those who have no voice.” While she now lives in Lafayette, Kentucky, Caitlin was born in Medina, Ohio, and her favorite part of the job is educating clients on their pets’ health. On a Friday night or weekend, you can probably find Caitlin outdoors or camping with friendsno glamping here. You won’t find her near a spooky, abandoned swimming pool. When asked whether she prefers to run a 5K or read, she amusingly said she would “probably read a book about running a 5K while snacking.” Caitlin shares her home with a slew of pets, who include eight cats, four horses, two dogs, one pig, one guinea pig, one duck, a gang of chickens, and a partridge in a pear tree (we made that last part up). Her sweet children, 7-year-old Clayton and 5-year-old Paisley, complete Caitlin’s family.

Samuel Cody Davis

Samuel comes to us from Nashville but currently lives in Clarksville, Tennessee. He officially joined our team in May, but we’ve known Samuel since 2017 when he was an intern with us. He has always loved science and learning how animals live and function, which eventually translated into his love of working with pets. His favorite part of the job is seeing how clients “light up” after we help their beloved pets. Samuel spends his time off work checking out the newest movies, reading comic books, eating dinner out, or cheering on the Predators at the Bridgestone arena with his dear fiancée, Haley. His two German shepherds, Thor and Storm, require a lot of couch space, but Arvi, the Chihuahua/corgi/dachshund mix, and Willow, “the sweetest cat ever,” fortunately require only lap space. If you catch Samuel staring into space, he may be dreaming about traveling to Australia and competing in a boxing match with a kangaroo. Samuel’s biggest fear? If Ben & Jerry’s were to discontinue their “half baked” flavor. 

We hope you’ve enjoyed this intimate look at our technicians. Stop by to meet them in person!

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What is AAHA Accreditation? https://www.loganvet.com/what-is-aaha-accreditation/ https://www.loganvet.com/what-is-aaha-accreditation/#respond Thu, 24 Oct 2019 18:46:17 +0000 https://www.loganvet.com/?p=827 AAHA-accredited practices are held to the highest standards, allowing them to provide the highest quality of care to their patients—your pets. Becoming an accredited practice is no easy task, and, in fact, only 12% to 15% of U.S. and Canadian veterinary practices are AAHA-accredited. Learn what AAHA accreditation entails, and the benefits to you and [...]

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AAHA-accredited practices are held to the highest standards, allowing them to provide the highest quality of care to their patientsyour pets. Becoming an accredited practice is no easy task, and, in fact, only 12% to 15% of U.S. and Canadian veterinary practices are AAHA-accredited. Learn what AAHA accreditation entails, and the benefits to you and your furry family members. 

What does it mean to be AAHA-accredited?

AAHA accreditation generally “helps make good hospitals great.” Practices interested in accreditation must undergo a lengthy application process, following a set of approximately 900 recommended standards that are considered mandatory or points-based. These standards include best practices in areas such as patient care, safety, recordkeeping, facility safety, and team morale. 

When a veterinary hospital applies for accreditation, they undergo a rigorous evaluation by an AAHA practice consultant. After passing the evaluation, the practice is evaluated a year later, and every three years after that. Most importantly, this process is completely voluntary. 

Why did Logan County Animal Clinic pursue AAHA accreditation?

Despite the challenging application process and stringent standards, becoming an AAHA-accredited practice is a truly rewarding experience. Our team enjoys a sense of pride and accomplishment after working toward a common goal, and we have confidence in knowing we have elevated the quality of our patient care, hospital safety, and day-to-day functioning. We’ve always focused on providing the best care for pets, and our AAHA accreditation holds us accountable to the highest standards in veterinary care and client service. 

What are some examples of required AAHA standards?

Of the approximately 900 AAHA standards, a few of the mandatory standards include:

  • Anesthetic agents must be administered by a veterinarian or trained practice team member under the supervision of a veterinarian.
  • Practice members must wear protective apparel in the radiology room during X-ray exposure.
  • All surgical patients must receive appropriate pain management.
  • Oxygen must be available for compromised patients.
  • Surgical suites must be in a separate, closed area that is used for aseptic procedures only.
  • Controlled substances must be securely locked away.

What does AAHA accreditation mean for your pet?

The fact that an AAHA-accredited practice has undergone the demanding requirements for accreditation conveys a dedication to excellent patient care and practice function. You and your pets can rest easy knowing our practice team is committed to providing your pet with outstanding care. 

Do pet owners prefer AAHA-accredited practices?

A 2016 study revealed that an overwhelming number of pet owners preferred AAHA-accredited practices. Some key points from the study include:

  • 85% of pet owners would choose an AAHA-accredited hospital over a nonaccredited one
  • 58% of pet owners are willing to pay more to use an accredited facility
  • 63% of pet owners would drive farther to get treatment at an accredited practice

Are any other area hospitals AAHA-accredited?

Logan County Animal Clinic is one of four veterinary clinics within a three-mile radius, and we’re  the only one that is AAHA-accredited. 

Contact our veterinary team to learn more about AAHA accreditation and what it means for you and your pet. 

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